Tag: guns

Pew Pew, Snap Snap: An Adventure in Polymer

Choices, Choices…

For the longest time, I didn’t particularly care much for any part of the machined steel top and molded polymer frame that comprises what is arguably one of the most popular handguns in the world. “Too boxy,” declared I. Decided when my first held pistol was none other than the equally world-famous Beretta 92FS which, in addition to being a reliable handgun, also boast what many argue is a fine-tuned, curvy aesthetic, a stark contrast to the no-nonsense, no-need-for-the-frills box shape of every Glock in existence. It wasn’t until I became more familiar with everything that could be done and just how flexible the weapon system was, converting from a simple sidearm to almost anything one could want with only a few interchangeable parts and for the really fancy-pants crowd, a little bit of gunsmithing. Want to shoot only 22LR? There’s a mod for it. 50GI? If you have one of Gaston’s 10mm varieties, there is a mod for that too. Want a carbine to shoot longer range? Simple change of the slide can make this happen. Have crappy ammo that you got at some two bit Fuddtastic gunshow? It’ll eat it with glee and ask for more.

Circlejerk and poetic waxing aside, through exposure, education and extensive handling during my last position as a gun salesman, I knew a Glock was in my future. The only question was… which one? The newish wunderkind and every Glock EDC aficionado’s wet dream G43? The hunting sidearm, hand cannon and 50AE candidate G20? MOS or regular sights? In the end, much like any Honda fanatic who started with a Civic will tell you, it’s all about the basics. Just as Honda has their Civic, about the only real comparison that transcends audiences in terms of functionality and upgrade/modification markets are even close to that of the austrian lead flinger, most Glock enthusiasts start with the G17, first in the lineup and grandfather to everything else that bears the now-infamous moniker of Glock. Needing a firearm to fill the 9mm Luger hole I, too, chose to start with model 17.

Why a Glock? It was not an easy choice, but one that was roughly three to four years in the making. For quite a while, I wanted something that was chambered in 9mm. Not necessarily for any reason aside from cost of ammunition and magazine capacity, both of which are factors to consider when shooting in competitions, which often mandate ~150-200 rounds per match and at least for IDPA, have rounds that require more than the 8-11 rounds carried by your standard .40 S&W or .45 ACP pistols, thus requiring a time-consuming reload and degrading overall end results. Prior to the Glock, I was using my trusty Beretta 96 which, though familiar, was limited in its capacity and at least competition, not all that competitive, especially against lighter, faster and higher capacity adversaries. If it were true, I’d say it held its own against the sole revolver competitor, but he isn’t known as Master Long for nothing. A new solution was required.

Enter the search for a new contender. Now, my lackluster IDPA results didn’t spur the search for a suitable 9mm, though it definitely placed a little more urgency on coming to a suitable conclusion. Much weighing of the different features and possibilities was done. As sexy as the 96 and 92FS are, I couldn’t help but lean towards the 17, even with the shiny curves and striking, almost-obsessive familiarity with the weapon system fostered by eight years of almost daily carry. Nothing says I won’t be getting one eventually, but for the foreseeable future, the G17 will be my competition firearm of choice.

Range Report: Paper Enemies Tremble

Buying the weapon was the beginning of making the decision to use it for IDPA/Steel shooting. Two hundred rounds, five thoroughly perforated targets and one shootingWon't you donate even one dollar to save this poor target and his family? lane hanger later my mind was made up. Loading the weapon’s magazine with the last two rounds is still a bit of a pain and the trigger’s slightly heavier than I’d like it (a 3.5 pound trigger kit should remedy that problem nicely), but once I became used to these minor issues, the pistol shot like a dream. Not a single stovepipe, double feed or failure to fire/eject was encountered though all two hundred rounds put through the pistol in the course of the hour. I’m sure the targets complained, but as there were quite a few others at the indoor range, no one heard their screams. Although this fine fellow on the right was but the first of many punched full of holes, I was surprised that his fellow targets all looked much the same, with variance due to my focus on certain aspects of marksmanship like only head shots, keeping the groupings as tight as I could while shooting at 5/7/15m and other self-imposed challenges.

 

The Future is Full of Mods

Since it is almost infinitely customizable, I do foresee many a customization coming to this pistol very soon. Almost all of them will be internal in nature, as the aesthetics have grown on me since first holding one many years ago. As mentioned above, a lighter trigger will be first, along with a polished feed ramp. Fortunately, I was able to acquire a Gen4 that already had AmeriGlo GL-201 night sights installed, so no need for new sights at the moment. I originally wanted a Gen3, as the side grip texture feels odd in my hand, but I predict it, too, will grow on me as more and more rounds are expelled from its barrel towards its enemies, paper, cardboard, fibreboard and steel alike.

 

TL;DR: I bought a Glock. It shoots good, pew pew.

Shooting: Less Pewpew, More Snapsnap

One of the many enjoyable aspects of my previous line of work was not only the access to a wide array of firearms but also my role in photographing said firearms for various reasons, one of which was for auction on Gunbroker. Fortunately, I saved a number of the guns that turned out the best and will be posting them here in the upcoming days. While many of them will have been featured on Gunbroker or Instagram, others are exclusive to this location that weren’t included for various reasons.  The Rest of the Story…

Work: The One & Hopefully Only Post on the Subject

  • Glock 17 Generation 4

The notice of resignation was dropped today, the anticipation and bracing for impact all for naught. No scenes caused, no need to flip the panic mode to the “on” position. For my current position, my last day is Saturday. As an avid firearm enthusiast, I will miss the behind-the-scenes aspects of working in a gun store, aside from the endless paperwork and documentation that comes with being a licensed dealer in all things pewpew related. Unless I become a frequent visitor to my local gun ranges, I shall become slightly deficient in what has become an almost daily inoculation of the technical, conspiratorial, dysfunctional and often times downright confusing world of those who tend to gravitate towards avid gun ownership.

I can’t say that I’ll miss a lot of the darker side, with some leaning heavily towards a thinly veiled “Christian Army Intent of Establishing a Caucasian Jeebus Theocracy” mindset.  Others are more content with calling the PotUS every derogatory name in the book of ethnic slurs at every available opportunity, looking at me as though I’m supposed to find all of it among the pinnacle of hilarity. What I will miss are the more helpful customers, who in addition to learning something from me while browsing the selection, imparted their own wisdom or tidbit of information on the particulars of a certain variety of firearm. That, and those who liked to talk about what kind of shooting they liked to do, such as those who compete in the various organizations, leagues and such. While these two groups of people are often one and the same, they’re two aspects of the retail firearms trade I’ll miss the most, as in my opinion, they represent the best the hobby has to offer in terms of overall image.

Access to a wide variety of interesting firearms in the interest of photographing them is another aspect of that job I’ll miss, maybe even more than the people of interest. I learned quite a lot about the world of product photography while taking photos for Gunbroker listings, much of which I was fortunate enough to be able to apply to make the photos better, and others which served to only frustrate me as the provided setup caused more frustration than inspiration. Still, the experience I gain from these frustrations has only served to make my own photography that much better. Still, it was nice to have access to firearms and other items that I had never even heard of before, much less had physical access to on a regular basis. Not only to photograph, but also be able to hold them, examine them from many different angles and take in everything that made them special and desirable to collectors and casual observers alike.

Current job aside, what is to be expected from my upcoming position? I don’t really know, aside from what I have seen in my brief time at the location in which I will be gainfully employed as of this coming Monday. What I have seen is an environment that is not at all like the call centers I have seen depicted in various mediums throughout my life; everyone appears to be reasonably happy and carefree, but still dedicated to what it is they do. For the first 8-12 weeks, though, I won’t be among them, as I’ll be going through roughly 480 hours of instruction, about unknown aspects of supporting the product/service/suite the company is contracted to do. I appreciate that it is a vastly more technically challenging field that what I was doing until this coming Saturday. I can appreciate the fact that the potential for growth and promotion is far greater than my current work environment allows, as promotion in a company of five is usually only accomplished upon retirement, death or striking out on one’s own, legitimately or by means that are less than savory. I also look forward to having more co-workers than the current number of one, who really wasn’t much of a coworker at all, given his status as a feathered fellow, foul-tempered and prone to biting as he was. He was most likely a much better gun salesman than I ever could be, so the fact that he remains is a good sign for the company.

Last, but most importantly, no more country music. I don’t particularly enjoy the modern brand of country music that has arisen over the last thirty years, find it to be too sappy for my tastes. I never again want to hear it when I’m trying to do calculus or anything else more complex than simple arithmetic, its presence being invasive even then.
While I don’t know what the future holds, I can say that I am looking forward to seeing where this new path in life takes me and the ship that is my family. Allons-y!